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Gourmet Honey 580 889 6486

Archive for August, 2006

Saw Palmetto Honey

Thursday, August 31st, 2006

This ground scrub Palm (Serenoa repens) grows wild throughout Florida, Georgia and Alabama. It is called saw palmetto, as it has small thorns that look like saw teeth on each side of the Palm frawn stem.buy Gourmet Honey Now Walking through the saw Palmetto could cause slicing right through your pants and flesh. This palm has a small trunk that lays on the ground and tilts 90° for the very small palm head to stand erect.

The saw Palmetto has been known in the natural remedy world for its herbal oil that is derived from the Palmetto Berry and used as a supplement for prostate enlargement. The gathering of these berries in recent times has caused gathers to be prosecuted for trespassing as the palmetto berry price nears five dollars a pound.

The blossom from the saw Palmetto is the source of a nectar that is not produced anywhere else in the world. Palmetto honey is the premier gourmet honey and has a flavor that can only be described by the taster. It has a distinct floral bouquet and an equally fine finish that would be used to describe a marvelous wine.

In the late 1960s, developers started clearing land for homes and businesses, slowly migrating inland from the coast of Florida, consuming palmettos by the thousands of acres. An acre of palmettos may take 50 to 75 years to grow to the maturity of producing marketable palmetto honey. Each year, the acres of palmettos shrink and the volume of palmetto honey goes down.

This unique gourmet honey, may one day be referred to only in fond memories. At the present, this premier honey graces the table of many native Floridians, a few gourmet chefs and some vacationers. Most Palmetto honey is consumed within the region that it is produced leaving little to be exported outside the tri-state area.

Palmetto honey ranges from light amber in color to amber, and has a water content of 15 to 17%. This mild and marvelous flavored honey has little or no aftertaste and granulates slower than most honey’s.

Experience the royal nectar of Saw Palmetto honey, purchased today!

Palmetto honey has become the perfect inclusion for gift givers. The honey gift is warmly received, tastes good for a moderate price. Surprise a friend with a honey of a gift that you can bet they haven’t received before and the recipient will love the taste!

Palmetto honey tea:
1 cup of hot water
1 teaspoon apple cider
stir and place a small leaf of spearmint in the tea.

palmetto honey,gourmet honey,honey gift, honey

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A Hive of Honey Bees

Wednesday, August 30th, 2006

We know that bees have been producing honey as they do today for at least 100 million years. Bees produce honey as food stores for the hive during the long months of winter when flowers aren’t blooming and therefore little or no nectar is available to them.buy Gourmet Honey Now European honey bees, genus Apis Mellifera, produce such an abundance of honey, far more than the hive can eat, that humans can harvest the excess. For this reason, European honey bees can be found in beekeeper’s hives around the world!

Honey bees are social insects, with a marked division of labor between the various types of bees in the colony. A colony of honey bees includes a queen, drones and workers.

The queen is the only sexually developed female in the hive. She is the largest bee in the colony. The life span of a queen bee is around 5 years, of which she can produce eggs, at its best, for the first 2 years. A productive queen can lay 2500 eggs in a single day, out of which 90% is female.

Workers feed the queen and larvae, guard the hive entrance and help to keep the hive cool by fanning their wings. Worker bees also collect nectar to make honey. Honey bees’ wings stroke 11,400 times per minute, thus making their distinctive buzz.

There can be 100,000 air miles in a pound of honey.

One gallon of honey corresponds to 12 pounds.

honey bee, gourmet honey, honey facts

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The Conversation US

A bee economist explains honey bees' vital role in growing tasty almonds
The Conversation US
While some crop pollination happens naturally, there's a commercial side to this as well. And that's where buzzing honey bees enter the picture. They represent by far the most commercialized provider of pollination services, with farmers across the ...
UC Davis engaging youngsters in bee pollination educationDaily Democrat
A bee economist explains honey bees' vital role in growing tasty ...San Francisco Chronicle

all 15 news articles »



Southwest Farm Press

Research focuses on pollinator biodiversity, conservation of habitat
Southwest Farm Press
Most of our fruits, nuts and vegetables require insect pollinators, he said. Almonds 100 percent require honeybees to pollinate their flowers to produce almonds. Blueberries, cranberries, cantaloupe, all the cucurbits, squash, pumpkins – they all ...




Inverse

The $11 Billion California Almond Economy Relies on Honey Bees to Thrive
Inverse
While some crop pollination happens naturally, there's a commercial side to this as well. And that's where buzzing honey bees enter the picture. They represent by far the most commercialized provider of pollination services, with farmers across the ...
Are Bees in a Death Spiral With Almonds?OZY
World Honey Bee Day today: There is need for more honey-made dishesFree Press Journal
Second lady Karen Pence brings buzz to VP residenceCNN
vdacs - Commonwealth of Virginia
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New York Times

The Super Bowl of Beekeeping
New York Times
Bees are central to an enormous agricultural industry — about one of every three mouthfuls of food we eat wouldn't exist without bee pollination — and beekeepers' custodianship of billions of these delicate animals is as much an art as it is a science.




KTVZ

Logging site slash removal may be boon for wild bees in managed ...
Science Daily
New research suggests the removal of timber harvest residue during harvesting may be a boon for wild bees, an important step toward better understanding the ...
OSU study: Logging slash removal may be boon to bees - KTVZKTVZ

all 3 news articles »



GazetteNET

Columnist Johanna Neumann: Important to protect the pollinators
GazetteNET
Bees pollinate 71 of the 100 crops that supply 90 percent of most of the world's food. Without bees we wouldn't have broccoli, peaches, apples, or — egad! — chocolate or coffee. Without bees, who would pollinate alfalfa, one of the main crops on ...




USDA.gov (press release) (blog)

APHIS and Partners Sponsor Annual Honey Bee Survey Directed at Monitoring Bee Health
USDA.gov (press release) (blog)
About one mouthful in three in our diets directly or indirectly benefits from honey bee pollination. That makes bees critically valuable to humans' existence. About one mouthful in three in our diets directly or indirectly benefits from honey bee ...




We're the First Campus in PA Certified by Bee Campus USA
Newsroom (press release)
Susquehanna University is the first university in Pennsylvania to be certified as an affiliate of the Bee Campus USA program, designed to marshal the strengths of educational campuses for the benefit of pollinators. "We are very proud to be the first ...




Pasadena Weekly

Ways to support our buzziest pollinators and protect threatened native bee habitat
Pasadena Weekly
An estimated one out of every three mouthfuls of food is pollinated at some point by bees, so maintaining healthy colonies and habitat is essential to Earth's ecosystem. Motivations for keeping bees are varied, as are the bees themselves. California is ...


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